Horology 2.0: Wearable Computing Pioneer Receives Notice of Allowance for Time-Telling Invention

Summary:  The United States Patent and Trademark Office has issued a Notice of Allowance in the case of a patent application filed on a new way to tell time. The new time display method uses colors instead of an hour hand or hour digit. Products using the new way to tell time are expected to be marketed under the brand name TWELV(TM)(http://www.twelv.com).

(Original press release:  LOS ANGELES, CALIF. JUNE 5, 2006)

The United States Patent and Trademark Office has issued a Notice of Allowance to award-winning inventor Shelley Harrison in the case of a patent application filed on a new way to tell time. The new time display method uses colors instead of an hour hand or hour digit. Products using the new way to tell time are expected to be marketed under the brand name TWELV(TM)(http://www.twelv.com).

TWELV time relies upon a series of twelve colors, each of which is uniquely assigned to an hour of the day. A color is displayed during the hour to which the color is assigned. Thus, for instance, during the six o’clock hour, the color green is displayed. Minutes are still indicated by numerical digits, which are set against a background that is the color corresponding to the given hour.

The TWELV time-telling system allows a number of advantages. For instance, holding display size constant, two digits can be displayed at a much larger size than can four digits. Meanwhile, colors can be correctly identified at much longer distances than can individual characters or clock hands. Thus, the new time-telling system offers a readability over greater distances than conventional time display methods allow.

Users do not need have to commit the colors to memory right away: the first wristwatch based upon the new technology, called the TIKR(TM), will include a manual override feature so that users can view time in conventional digital format simply by touching the screen or a button.

Harrison holds three patents in the field of wearable computing, including wrist-wearable computers, PDAs, telephones and audio players. He is founder of Wearable Computing(R), an Internet portal, and is most known for creation of the Orang-Otang(R) Peel-It(R), a product that serves as both a case and a wrist-mount for consumer electronic devices such as the Palm PDA or the Apple iPod.

A working demo of the invention can be viewed at http://www.twelv.com/demo5.htm.

TWELV | Sample Color-to-Hour Training Image
TWELV | Sample Color-to-Hour Training Image